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Table of Contents for
The Huguenots and French Opinion, 1685–1787: The Enlightenment Debate on Toleration by Geoffrey Adams

List of Illustrations

Acknowledgements

Introduction

PART ONE: THE REVOCATION IMPOSED, 1685–1715


I. The Edict of Fontainebleau: The Rationalization of Intolerance

II. Thunderous Applause, Discreet Dissent: The Intellectual Reaction to the Revocation

III. A Three-way Impasse: The Huguenots, The Clergy, and The State

PART TWO: THE REVOCATION ATTACKED, 1715–1760


IV. An Abstract Combat: Voltaire’s First Battles Against Intolerance, 1713–1750

V. Montesquieu and the Huguenots: A Conservative’s View of Minority Rights

VI. A Friend in the Enemy Camp: The Abbé Prévost

VII. Controller–General Machault Provokes a Public Debate on Huguenot Rights, 1751–1760

VIII. Encyclopedists and Calvinists: An Exercise in Mutual Aid

IX. A Case Study in Incompatibility: The Philosophe Voltaire and the Calvinist La Beaumelle, 1750–1756

X. Mutual Disenchantment: Voltaire and the Genevans, 1755–1762

XI. Distant Cousins: Rousseau and the French Calvinists

XII. The Stage in the Service of Huguenot Emancipation: Voltaire, Fenouillot de Falbaire, and Mercier

XIII. Reaction Put to Rout: The Dictionnaire Philosophique, the Last of the Encyclopedie and the Bélisaire Affair, 1764–1767

PART THREE: THE REVOCATION UNDONE, 1760–1787


XIV. The 1760s: From Words to Deeds

XV. The Calas Affair: A Catalyst for the National Conscience, 1762–1765

XVI. Large Expectations, Limited Gains: The Reform Efforts of Turgot and Malesherbes, 1774–1776

XVII. Conservatives and Pragmatists Try Their Hand: Necker, Armand, and the Parlementaires, 1776–1784

XVIII. Genteel Conspirators: Breteuil and Malesherbes Set the Stage for Reform, 1784–1787

XIX. Spurs to Action: The D’Anglure Affair and the Dutch Crisis, 1787

XX. Toleration Triumphant: The Edict of 1787

Epilogue

Selected Bibliography

Index