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Table of Contents for
The Costa Rican Catholic Church, Social Justice, and the Rights of Workers, 1979–1996 by Dana Sawchuk

Acknowledgments

Abbreviations

Acknowledgments

Preface

1. Introduction

Studies of the Church and Politics in Latin America

Studies of the Pre-1979 Church in Costa Rica

The Scope and Theme of This Study

Theoretical Considerations

Chapter Outline

2. Crisis in Costa Rica

Post-Civil War Economic Development

The Crisis and Government Policies

Popular Reactions to the Crisis

Conclusion

3. The Unions in the Face of the Crisis

Problems for the Costa Rican Union Movement

Promise in the Costa Rican Union Movement

Limón en Lucha

Conclusion

4. Official Catholic Social Teaching on Workers’ Issues

Strikes and Unions in Catholic Social Teaching

Contrasting Approaches to Social Justice

Persistent Conservatism in Catholic Social Teaching

Conclusion

5. Monseñor Arrieta and CECOR

The Man They Call Manzanita

The Church Hierarchy’s Political Pronouncements and Preferences

The Costa Rican Bishops and Workers’ Rights

Conclusion

6. CECODERS

The Centre’s Structure and Programming

The Controversial 1986 Folleto

CECODERS and Catholic Social Teaching

CECODERS and the Union Movement

Conclusion

7. Limón Province

Socio-Economic Conditions in Limón

The Institutional Insecurity of the Limón Church

Conclusion

8. The ESJ23

Padre Solano and the Expansion of the ESJ23

The ESJ23 and Catholic Social Teaching

Another Side to the School’s Success

Conclusion

9. The Official Church in Limón

The Limón Church under Monseñor Coto

The 1989 Carta Pastoral

A New Bishop in a New Diocese

The Limón Church and Catholic Social Teaching

Conclusion

10. Liberationist and Conservative Catholicisms in Costa Rica and Beyond

The Conservative-Liberationist Struggle within the Costa Rican Church

Final Reflections


Notes

Bibliography

Index