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Struggles for Justice in Canada and Mexico - Themes and Theories about Social Mobilization

Struggles for Justice in Canada and Mexico

Themes and Theories about Social Mobilization

By Linda Snyder
Subjects Development Studies, Social Policy, Sociology
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Paperback : 9781771122788, 307 pages, January 2017
Ebook (EPUB) : 9781771122702, 307 pages, January 2017

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Table of contents

Table of Contents

List of Acronyms

Acknowledgements

Introduction

 

1 | The Context of the Struggles

ONE: GLOBAL

Aggressive Capitalism

Responses to Neo-liberalism

Oppressed Populations

 

TWO: CANADA

The Socio-historical Background

Economic Neo-liberalism in Canada

Responses to Neo-liberalism in Canada

Oppressed Populations

 

THREE: MEXICO

The Socio-historical Background

Neo-liberalism in Mexico

Responses to Neo-liberalism in Mexico

Oppressed Populations

 

2 | The Stories of Struggle for Change

FOUR: INCOME GENERATION

Coffee Co-operatives

Other Producer Co-operatives

Income Generation Projects with External Support

 

FIVE: HEALTH, HOUSING, AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Communities Organizing to Promote Health and Wellness

Communities Dealing with Health and Related Matters

Communities in Conflict with Canadian Mining Companies

 

SIX: WOMEN’S RESOURCES AND ADVOCACY

Women’s Resource Projects

Women Engaged in Advocacy

The Women’s Council of the San Cristóbal Diocese in Chiapas, Mexico

 

SEVEN: GRASSROOTS SUPPORT ORGANIZATIONS AND INDEPENDENT COMMUNITY ORGANIZERS

The Community Development Workshop (TADECO) in Guerrero, Mexico

Two Independent Neighbourhood Organizers in Guerrero, Mexico

COMPA: Convergence of People’s Movements in the Americas

 

3 | Themes and Theories in the Struggles for Justice

EIGHT: THE PURPOSES OF THE COLLECTIVE ENDEAVOURS

The Challenges of the Context

The Motivating Influences

 

NINE: THE NATURE AND THE STRUCTURE OF THE COLLECTIVE WORK

The Principles, Objectives, and Commitment to Working Together

The Manner of Doing the Work and Structuring the Organizations

The Resources, Challenges, and Shared Benefits of the Collective Work

 

TEN: THE MEANS OF MOBILIZING FOR THE COLLECTIVE GOOD

The Focus of the Mobilization Activities and the Organizer Roles

Aspects of Mobilization Strategy

 

ELEVEN: CHALLENGES, CELEBRATIONS, AND CONCEPTUALIZATIONS

Challenges Faced in the Social Mobilization Process

Outcomes, Celebration, and Historical Review

Overall Conceptualizations for Bringing about Greater Justice

 

CONCLUSION

The Interdisciplinary Approach

The Ideals, Theory, Objectives, and Practice Methods

Thoughts for Further Research

My Hopes and Beliefs

 

Appendix: The Case Studies

References

Index

Description

Struggles for Justice in Canada and Mexico examines Canadian and Mexican communities engaged in collective action to address problems related to the context of aggressive capitalism, which favours economic freedom of the powerful over the needs of people and the planet. The book’s several case examples portray income-generating projects; action to promote health, adequate housing, and a safe environment (including resistance to mining); women’s resource and advocacy programs; as well as grassroots support organizations and independent organizers.

The author gathered stories in six states in the south of Mexico and two provinces in Canada between 2004 and 2010, with follow-up to 2012. Thematically, they centre on oppression and struggles for rights experienced by the poor, women, and Indigenous peoples. The author’s case-study method bolsters her narratives by including interviews, observation, and some participant-observation, with analysis that draws on social movement theory from sociology and community organizing theory from social work as well as knowledge from social psychology, liberation theology, popular education, and political science. The book presents the common themes and illustrates the central theories for practitioners in the many fields that promote social justice: social work, social development, health, human rights, environmental protection, and faith-based justice movements, among others. The conclusion presents a framework for conceptualizing social justice practice as a congruent paradigm composed of values, theory, objectives, and practice methods.